The 8 Biggest Bone Broth Mistakes You Can Easily Avoid

“Bone broth is the new green juice,” everyone is saying these days. But to get in on this magic elixir you have to make it right…

soup in white ceramic bowl

And unfortunately, most people are making it wrong. There is a lot of bad information out there circulating about bone broth and what ingredients are actually in the bone broth when you buy it at the store. Did you know that most boxed brands only contain 30% organic meat??? This article will tell you how to avoid common mistakes when making your own amazing homemade bone broth.

1) Using NOT ENOUGH BONES & TOO MUCH WATER

You need bones! I understand not everyone has access to or can afford organic, grass-fed beef bones all the time. But, if you can get your hands on these bones as often as possible please do so! I highly recommend having at least 4 lbs of bones per every 2 gallons of water you use to make your broth.

Too many people also make the mistake of using too much water and not enough bones. A good starting point is 2 gallons of filtered water for every 4-5 pounds of bones used.

2) Using ARTIFICIAL COOKING GRIDS

Cooking with artificial grids will never create the proper gelatinous bone broth consistency. The only way to create a jelly-like substance is by cooking over wood-based grids over an open flame for 24-48 hrs minimum depending on how much you are making.

You can also use a crockpot or Instapot on the “stew” or “meat/poultry” setting, but I have found that these appliances don’t always produce the same results.

3) Skipping THE MAIN EVENT: BROTH GELS!

If you want to make authentic bone broth, you MUST cook the bones long enough to release all of the valuable nutrients and minerals are hidden inside. This means allowing the broth to gel properly. If your broth doesn’t gel, it’s not done yet! 

4) adding INGREDIENTS BEFORE IS COMPLETE 

Adding vegetables and herbs before the broth has completed gelling will create a cloudy broth. The only ingredients that should be added at the end are salt and pepper. I prefer to add turmeric, black pepper, and Himalayan sea salt for their anti-inflammatory properties.

You can cook all of your vegetables in a separate pot while the broth is cooking if you would like to have them in there but don’t want your broth cloudy. The amount of time needed to cook vegetables will vary based on how big they are cut up into.

When adding ingredients that take longer than 5 hrs to cook (such as parsnips or potatoes) wait until 24 hours before turning off the flame so they are not overcooked/mushy when served with dinner!

4) HOMEMADE BROTH IS NOT AS GOOD AS THE STORE-BOUGHT ONES

This could not be further from the truth! The store-bought bone broths are often loaded with MSG, preservatives, and other chemicals that you do not want to be ingesting. I have found that my homemade broth always tastes better and I know exactly what ingredients are in it.

5) COOKING BROTH FOR TOO LONG WILL DESTROY NUTRIENTS

This is another myth that is, unfortunately, circulating. Yes, if you cook your broth for too long some of the nutrients will be destroyed. But, the benefits of bone broth far outweigh any minor losses of nutrients. If you are following a recipe correctly and cooking your broth for the correct amount of time, you will not have anything to worry about.

6) BOUILLON CUBES ARE THE SAME AS HOMEMADE BROTH

Bouillon cubes are loaded with MSG and other unhealthy chemicals. They are not the same as homemade broth.

7) ALL BROTH IS CREATED EQUAL

Not all broth is created equal. The store-bought broths often contain unhealthy ingredients and chemicals that you do not want to be ingesting. Homemade broth is made with love, and all of the ingredients are organic and natural.

8) I DON’T HAVE TIME TO MAKE MY BROTH

This is probably the most common excuse I hear for why someone doesn’t make their broth. The most common cooking time that I hear is 18-24 hours. But there are so many recipes out there for broth that have cooking times of 4, 6, 8, 10, even 12 hours! You can find a recipe based on your schedule and desired results.

If you are still not convinced it’s time to make your bone broth in the crockpot or slow cooker, and have a peek here.

Thank you so much for checking out my article!

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